Published by Neide Published on October 8, 2020

Photographed by Emily in Paris co-star Ashley Park, Lily talks with Coveteur about the new Netflix show, working with Patricia Field and fashion. Outtakes have been added to our gallery, and you can read the article below.

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Patricia Field is known for her amazing costumes in fashion-favorite films, from Sex and the City to The Devil Wears Prada to Confessions of a Shopaholic, each of which take a person on a fantasy-inducing sartorial safari through unexpected pattern combinations and ostentatious yet modern silhouettes. So when Lily Collins got the offer to work with not only Field but also Darren Star, creator of Sex and the City and Younger, she was immediately hooked on what she calls “a golden nugget.”

Their new show, Emily in Paris, available on Netflix as of October 2nd, is by no means the beginning of Collins’ fashion journey. The young actress has worked in films like Mirror, Mirror with corseted gowns and The Mortal Instruments with edgy, leather-filled looks. On the other side of the camera, she has the privilege of experimenting with the best that fashion has to offer on the red carpet and more.

As those have been put on hold for the time being, Collins has swapped gowns for sweats. So she couldn’t resist the opportunity for a little socially distanced shoot. Along with her costar Ashley Park, who plays Emily’s best friend Mindy, the two staged an impromptu shoot with the clothes they had on hand at their director’s ranch in Northern California (COVID tests were administered beforehand, of course). “It was really special also, because we were like, ‘Wait, this is so “Emily and Mindy” of us to do,’” says Collins. “Little did we know that a year after we met, from Paris to a ranch, we’d be having some crazy Emily in Paris experience together documented in photos.”

Have you always loved fashion, or has it been something you’ve had to embrace since you’ve started acting?

“I’ve been a fashion lover since I could put clothes on. My mom tells me stories about how I would have such a specific point of view on what I wanted to wear. I would go vintage shopping with her. I loved color and patterns. My style has definitely evolved over the years, but fashion has always been something constant. For me, fashion designers are artists, and sometimes I get so overwhelmed meeting them, more so than other actors. It’s such a fascinating craft, and their mind works in ways that I deeply admire. I feel very fortunate that my job allows me to experiment with fashion in different ways, but it’s definitely something that I always wanted to tap into.”

How does being in the spotlight affect your personal style?
“I think every character that I play informs me of new fashion personalities, if you will. When I did Mortal Instruments, and it was more gothic and dark—there was a lot of black and leather and stuff like that—I started incorporating more of a darker ‘rock and roll’ feel. Then when I did Mirror, Mirror, it was obviously more princess-y and more feminine and regal. And then Emily. Oh my god, working with Patricia Field, it was like patterns and colors and textures and designers and just all of those things all at once, and it was never too much for Emily. I get to express myself in different ways through my characters and through fashion.”

It’s such a cool thing that acting and fashion share that ability to create a character:

“For me, the relationship with the costume designer and creative designer of any TV show, movie, or any project that I do is so important because you’re creating the essence of the character. It’s what you feel like every day when you step into those clothes that helps inform how you’re going to move and breathe and live as that person. Every single outfit that you wear really dictates how you feel that day. Like in real life, if you’re wearing comfortable sweatpants versus a very fitted dress to go out, you carry yourself differently. The way that you dress really affects your mood and it affects the way that you create a character.”

On creating her character Emily through costume:

“Emily is bright and bubbly and unafraid to take risks. That translates directly into her fashion. I didn’t want her to be a character that has some kind of transformation in order to be accepted, to have that scene where she goes in the dressing room looking one way and comes out Parisian. We wanted it to be that she’s very much herself in all ways throughout the season, she just starts to pick up a little bit of Parisian fashion sense here and there. I think she, like myself, grew up loving Carrie Bradshaw, she loves French Vogue, she loves all these magazines that allow her to soak in the culture. And what would she wear when she goes to Paris? She’s going to wear the Eiffel Tower on her shirt. That’s who she is. Then she’ll do something like throw a beret on, but it’s always in that Emily way. It’s never understated, but that’s what you love about her, or at least that’s what I love about her.”

You said you grew up watching Carrie Bradshaw. Was it so exciting for you to work on a Darren Star show and work with Patricia Field?

“Oh my god, I was over the moon. It was already so cool knowing it was a Darren Star project; if you add Patricia Field to it, I was like, ‘This is a golden nugget.’ I so admire her and all her work throughout the years and just her eye. She’s so specific and so unafraid. That obviously so deeply translates to Emily as a character, that idea of embracing different colors and patterns and textures. It’s like, ‘How do you express yourself through fashion in a way that says everything you want to say and you stay true to who you are?’ That’s Patricia. She was so adamant about being so collaborative with me right off the bat. She really wanted this to be a mutual experience. And Marylin Fitoussi, the French designer who came on board with Patricia, was also just so incredible. Her eye mixed with Patricia’s just created such an amazing character that we all could just every day giggle at and go, ‘Oh my god, how fun is this?’”

I know you’ve been very open about your relationship with self-image, and I was wondering if fashion has played a role in all that for you?

“One’s relationship with their body is so personal. I’m really somebody who embraces feeling at peace with myself and that mind-body-soul connection of learning and educating myself on how to be more comfortable in my own skin. My stylist Rob and Mariel have had a really big impact on me in terms of pushing me outside my comfort zone of what I thought I’d feel good in. They allow me to feel unafraid to wear different silhouettes that I maybe didn’t think would suit me before. Understanding one’s body through clothes is a really interesting experience. It’s all in the tailoring, and they’ve taught me so much about that.”

“Sometimes there is something that’s super in style at the moment [that] just doesn’t work for me. And I’m kind of like, ‘OK great, I can appreciate it on her, but it doesn’t work for me,’ instead of wearing it just to wear it and then feeling awful in it. What’s the point of that? Literally what’s the point? I can appreciate it in a magazine. I can appreciate it on a friend or on a model. I think it’s just realizing that not everything’s going to work on your body type and to embrace what works on you. Obviously, when you’re younger, everyone wants to wear the same trends. The older you get, you’re just like, ‘Cool, if it doesn’t work on me, there’s 10 million other fashion things that I can wear that will look good.’”

What have been your favorite red carpet looks so far?

“This year for obvious reasons the Met Ball didn’t happen, but I always love that experience. The Met Ball is always a moment where I get to play and have fun and lean on my hair, makeup, and stylists to create a character. Every year is different. It’s an opportunity to play. In those situations, I don’t want to just look the same. I don’t want to just look like myself. I want to allow them to create a character and do what it is that they do best. That’s what I rely on them for and what I respect them for. Then we can come together and have fun.”

Published by Neide Published on

It’s no news that when Lily goes on promotion mood, we are blessed with beautiful photoshoots. This time around it’s for The Laterals latest digital issue, where Lily speaks not only about Emily in Paris but also about the inner work that has led her on the path to her best self. You can find the photos in our gallery, and don’t forget to read the article below!

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Bright Night Of The Soul is how I’d characterize my lasting impression of Lily Collins. Sitting down for a conversation with an actress comes with a few days of preparation. There’s scheduling, there’s research to be done, and for me, it ends with the magic of somehow, after perusing countless interviews, and archived stories, of trying to pinpoint who my subject truly is outside of their big and small screen counterparts. The truth is, the celebrity interview is one of infinite outcomes. None of them lend themselves to predictability. Will they be reserved? Will she be giving? Who is she, really?

The days leading up to my chat with Lily Collins felt very much like those of my past assignments, but the days that followed after would be entirely…contrasting to say the least. Lily can be seen playing the sunny Emily Cooper in Netflix’s latest gift Emily in Paris. Timing is everything, and it is essential to the arrival of this new series that embodies escapism and “feel good” in its truest form. For Collins, it’s a story of self-love, empowerment, and peeling off the layers that reveal your truest self. For audiences, it’s a chance to escape the harsh realities that seem to multiply since the world upped and changed just a few months into the decade. Lily is poised, intelligent, sensible, and brimming with mindfulness. No research in the world would have prepared me for the experience that was to follow after I picked up the phone for this scheduled call–that felt like the gathering of two would-be-friends. As I said, an interview like this is meant to shed light on the sensibilities and qualities often in hiding when an actor is in full character. In this case, a portrait of an artist as a young woman. The result was immeasurably so much more.

Hi. I want to start by saying congratulations on your engagement. So exciting!

Oh my God, thank you. That’s so sweet of you.

Published by Neide Published on October 4, 2020

While promoting Emily in Paris the past weeks, Lily had a fun zoom interview and photoshoot with CR Fashion Book, during which she spoke about filming Emily in Paris, social media, and Paris. You can read about it below, and check out the photos in our gallery!

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When Lily Collins found herself on Avenue Montaigne in Paris just over a year ago it was not to kick off a week of catwalks and fashionable fêtes as per Septembers’ past. Fashion Week would go on indeed, but the actress would for once not be in attendance. Instead, Collins, who moved to the French capital for a few months for filming, had one only one show on her mind. Debuting today on Netflix, Emily in Paris brings the 31-year-old to the streaming screen as Emily, a Chicago millennial who is transferred to Paris temporarily when the marketing conglomerate she works at acquires a boutique fashion firm. When she arrives to her new setting with an Eiffel Tower charm in tow, Emily is greeted with a grimace and what can only be described as a haute couture critique. The quick-paced, over-the-top series is a mix of Devil Wears Prada and Sex and the City—and for good reason, it was created by TV legend Darren Star (SATC, Beverly Hills, 90210, Melrose Place) with costume design by the incomparable Patricia Field. (In fact, Emily uses Field’s own vintage camera-themed iPhone case throughout the entire show as her signature.) Here, Collins speaks to CR about relocating to the City of Love, how the lines between the show and real life blurred, and what she’s learned about social media.

Emily in Paris is such a fun, easy watch, but it’s pretty different than some of your past works. What drew you to the project?
“Emily herself is such a fun character to get to play because she’s funny, she’s driven, and she doesn’t take herself too seriously. She loves fashion but she’s also really good at her job—all these things that so many people can relate to. For an actor to be able to have fun with a role like that was such a blast. And also, hello, it’s Paris! It was a no brainer. I grew up loving Sex and the City, and I think that the worlds that Darren creates in his shows are ones that you can just disappear into as you binge-watch.”

Published by Neide Published on September 22, 2020

Hello Lilyians! It’s been some slow times with news, but we hope everyone is okay and being safe. Lily’s been doing some virtual press tour for Emily in Paris, set to premiere October 2nd on Netflix. One of her interviews was with W magazine, and you can find the full interview below, along with a couple of portraits taken by Charlie McDowell.

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The actress Lily Collins recently found peace sitting on a surfboard in the Pacific Ocean, waiting for a wave to come. Of all the activities Collins took up while quarantining at her home in Los Angeles over the summer—jamming through stacks of books about meditation and self-reflection; listening to podcasts from Brené Brown and Jay Shetty, a former monk; going on road trips to Northern California—surfing became a particular favorite. After some lessons on land from her boyfriend, Charlie McDowell, an avid surfer himself, she’d wade in. When the swell came, she’d hop up on her board, trying to be as strong as she could, focused on simply getting on her feet and staying there. She realized she had no control over the water, which would sometimes completely take her over, swallow her up in its power, and then spit her back out onto the shore. Whenever that happened, Collins just let it ride out, face-planting into sand, often in front of other beach-goers. What else could she do?

On the phone a couple months later, Collins is one of the few people you’ll hear describe her experience in lockdown as “amazing, actually.”

“I know it’s super strange, but I haven’t been stationary in one place for this long in—I can’t remember how long,” 31-year-old Collins says. But like most others, she spent the time forced to do a fair amount of reflection on what she wanted from her life: without the distractions of traveling, work, spending time with friends and family, going outside, a metaphorical mirror was placed in front of her, forcing her to dig deep and look at the things about herself she might have usually ignored.

Published by Neide Published on April 11, 2019

Fantastic news, Lilyians, we finally got more information on the photoshoot released a while ago of Lily for Paper magazine! The digital magazine has revealed that Lily was their April cover and along with the revelation, we were blessed with more outtakes and an interview that you can read below!

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Ahead of playing one of the biggest parts of her career — Fantine in BBC’s upcoming Les Misérables — we cast Lily Collins in a new role as a mythical angel of Hollywood, flitting unseen through the streets of Los Angeles while giving young, starry-eyed hopefuls some divine inspiration.

Lily Collins isn’t the type of person who relishes downtime. So in 2016, when the actress saw an unusually blank stretch in front of her work-wise, she decided to fill it by writing her first memoir. She set up six months of intense deadlines, but “of course, as luck would have it, the second that I got these deadlines and a publisher and editor, I booked three [acting] projects back to back,” Collins says. “So, what was going to be my Sex in the City / Carrie Bradshaw / move to New York and write a book moment then [became] writing in and out of LA on sets. It turned out to be one of the proudest accomplishments, but also one of the hardest things I’ve ever done.”

The end result was last year’s Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me, a well-received collection of honest, introspective essays reflecting on life as the daughter of a megastar father (Phil Collins of Genesis and solo fame); growing up in LA after moving from England following her parents’ divorce; dating and her longtime struggle with an eating disorder. The book’s release was timed with her starring turn in To the Bone, a Netflix film about a woman battling anorexia that earned Collins rave reviews but also had her preparing for the physically and emotionally daunting role while digging into her own past. “I felt like I needed to unload some baggage in order to move forward on a clean slate,” she says. “It just so happened to be before I turned 30, which was wonderful to go into that next phase of my life, but it was also something I knew personally and also professionally needed to happen.”

Published by Neide Published on July 27, 2017

Sitting down with Digital Spy, Lily tells the publication about how she walked into the audition room and in the end, secured her role as Cecelia Brady in The Last Tycoon. A very short talk, where she also discusses the appeal of picking TV roles over movie ones, and you can read all about it bellow!

Lily Collins has suggested that her lifelong obsession with old-Hollywood glamour was pivotal in securing her a role in Amazon Prime’s 1930s drama The Last Tycoon.

The actress plays “go-getter” Cecelia Brady in the TV adaptation of F Scott Fitzgerald’s last, unfinished roman-à-clef, which follows the ambitions of young executive Monroe Stahr (Matt Bomer) and his power struggle with studio boss Pat Brady, Cecilia’s father (Kelsey Grammer). Written and directed by Oscar-nominated screenwriter Billy Ray (Captain Phillips, The Hunger Games), the series also captures an era darkened by the Depression and the growing influence of Hitler.

“I’ve been so obsessed with old Hollywood forever,” Collins told Digital Spy. “And Cecelia is so multilayered, she’s fascinating. She’s naïve, she’s feisty, she’s passionate, compassionate, hardworking, and a go-getter – all these adjectives of a character that I would love to play around with. I went in the audition, and I was the only one to read for him [writer-director Billy Ray] and I dressed in 1930s hair and make-up and wardrobe.”

The series has recruited a team which includes Oscar-winning production designer Patrizia von Brandenstein, and Emmy-winning costume designer Janie Bryant (Mad Men) to bring Hollywood’s golden era to life.

Collins also discussed the appeal of picking TV roles over movie ones, saying there’s longer to “flesh out” a role, and an excitement at not knowing what will come next for your character. “You have so much time to flesh out a character and you get to spend more time with the people you’re working with, and develop relationships on camera that you would have to beat along in a film,” Collins continued.

“Because you have longer to tell their story, and the pedigree of this project was so amazing, it felt like a mini-film. You couldn’t tell this story in a film; it had been done before, but the idea that it was left unfinished left it open to so much more story to be told. And you don’t get to have that on a film set that you don’t know where your character story is headed in the next episode, which can be unnerving but exciting.”

The Last Tycoon is available exclusively on Amazon Prime Video from July 28.

Published by Neide Published on July 14, 2017

USA Today wasn’t the only publication Lily spoke to while doing press for To The Bone. Harper’s Bazaar was another publication that Lily spoke with, in which she is questioned about how she did research for the movie, the key factors that helped her recover from the eating disorder and what advice would she give anyone who’s suffering from it.

Playing an anorexia victim would be a challenging role for any actress, let alone if they’ve suffered from an eating disorder in the past. Lily Collins took the risk when she took on To The Bone, which stages the journey of a young woman battling with anorexia as she enters a group rehabilitation home.

Directed by Marti Noxon – best known for her producing and directing work on TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer – the film is part autobiographical, rendering it more accurate than former, more simplistic screen representations of the disorder – there are secret sit-ups in the dead of the night, xylophone chests and animal-like cries of the truly tormented. Although expectedly disturbing in parts, it’s also flecked with a dark humour that was important to both Collins and Noxon.

Collins herself lost a huge amount of weight for the part and, harrowingly, was even complimented on her appearance – a dangerous situation to be in for someone who has fought an eating disorder in the past. However, it’s exactly reactions like these that prompted her to sign up to the film – which at that point didn’t even have a distributor.

Ahead of the film’s Netflix release on Friday 14 July, we talked to Collins about the project and how it helped her come to terms with her own relationship with food.

Given your history, did you have any reservations about taking the role on?

“I got this script randomly – I had ironically just written a chapter in my book about my history having an eating disorder just a week prior. So it felt that the universe was saying that this is probably something you should be talking about on a much larger scale. I never reached the point where I needed medical attention and went to hospital, so I never took the time to talk about the facts. You tend to surround yourself with myth when you’re going through an eating disorder. I saw it as an opportunity to better understand my disorder better. I was nervous, but also really excited to finally tell my story through a character, but also unburden myself. It was very freeing.”

Published by Neide Published on

Lily sat down with USA Today recently, where she spoke about why she chose to take on the role of Ellen in Netflix’s anorexia movie, her own experiences and much more. You can read the whole interview bellow!

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — In Netflix’s new anorexia movie To the Bone (streaming Friday), Lily Collins’ character Ellen has a compulsive habit of measuring her tiny arm. The young woman wraps her thumb and middle finger around her barely-there bicep to check that her fingertips meet. They usually do — that’s how sickly she is — and indicate how small Collins chose to get for the part.

Beefing up and slimming down for roles is all part of the job of an actor. But for Collins, 28, there was an added danger: She wanted to look like someone with anorexia, years after overcoming her own disordered eating, which included consuming nearly nothing, using diet pills and throwing up.

“I personally knew that this was something I needed to do to tell this story,” says Collins, who struggled with both anorexia and bulimia. “I wanted to be able to best exert my experiences on (Ellen) by going to the lengths I felt comfortable going to as an actor.”

That meant looking thin enough to worry her fans, who “lovingly, were concerned” after seeing the actress in paparazzi photos taken while she was preparing for the movie. She won’t disclose how much she lost, “but I was held accountable by a nutritionist, by (our director), by my mother, by our producer,” she says.

“There was never any time limit, there was never a (weight) number, (but) I didn’t want to get to the end of this experience and feel like I didn’t access what I needed to portray Ellen,” says Collins, who on this day at the London West Hollywood hotel looks radiant and “strong,” as the film’s writer/director Marti Noxon points out. “I can honestly say I gave it everything that I could and was able to stay Lily.”

Miss Lily Collins • Fan source for actress Lily Collins